Hate Begotten Of Hate

HATE BEGOTTEN OF HATE: Louis Farrakhan and The Nation of Islam

(Part Four in a series on Islam from Forward magazine)

"I looked over Jordan, what did I see, coming for to carry me home? A band of angels coming after me, coming for to carry me home." (old Negro spiritual)

"If in this life only we have hope in Christ, we are of all men the most pitiable." (1 Cor. 15:19)

The Christian belief in an afterlife with Christ has been a source of strength and hope for millions of people from the first century to the present. All Christians have longed for the day when there will be no more death, no more shedding of tears, when sorrow and pain have passed away, and when we no longer see "through a glass darkly" but are with Jesus face to face. As the apostle Paul said, "For to me, to live is Christ, and to die is gain" (Phil. 1:21).

But Christianity is not simply an other-worldly hope with no thoughts of the present. The apostle Paul went on to declare: "Nevertheless to remain in the flesh is more needful for you" (v.23). Thus the Christian faith is concerned with both our life here and with our eternal life with God after our work here has been completed.

In America a movement has arisen challenging Christianity; indeed, arising largely because of the church's failure to meet the "this-worldly" needs of some of the poorest in this land. It is a religion solely interested in the affairs of this life and the physical betterment of its people. It is a faith based on racism and hate which expects that all of its enemies will soon be destroyed, and that its members will then rule the world. And it is rapidly gaining an ear among many of the afflicted and downtrodden in this country who have waited too long to see justice and equality become a reality for them; who have often heard that "all men are created equal" but have rarely seen this principle applied. Its name is the Nation of Islam and its leader is Minister Louis Farrakhan.